Websites, apps and social media mirror and reflect the lives of young people, but they may also have a deep impact on their personal experiences so how can we be keeping children safe online.

Mark Bentley, online safety and safeguarding manager from the London Grid for Learning, talks to QA Education about the NSPCC’s new survey on children’s online activity.

How has children’s online activity changed in the last 24 months since the last survey?

One of the biggest trends we’re seeing is the increased popularity of live streaming. Live streaming allows users to see events unfold literally as they happen, as well as broadcast their own lives for friends to watch. 

2018 - everyone is online students, teachers and parents

In light of recent news that one in three teachers have reported derogatory comments posted about them on social media from parents and children, the discussion around student and teacher communication practices is becoming increasingly vital. 

The interaction with teachers on social media raises a lot of questions: Is there a need for out-of-school hours communication? If so, what channels should they be using? Do teachers need to be more careful about revealing their identities on social media?

Tuesday 6 February marks Safer Internet Day 2018, with activities taking place across the UK to inspire a national conversation about protecting children online. The slogan for this year is:  “Create, Connect and Share Respect: A better internet starts with you." It's not too late to take part – the activities can be scheduled at any point in the year and there are a raft of resources which can be used to plan.

There’s no doubt that children are using social media more and more. Whether in school or at home, children spend a seemingly ever-increasing amount of time using apps and the internet for school work, home work, watching video, playing games – and, of course, social media.

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2017-03-09T00:00:00

Two thirds of the teaching profession are women and yet only one third reach a level of leadership. This is an incredible and tragic fact, isn’t it?!

 

For most, this might be surprising, yet in the 21st Century we have all continued to allow it to happen. Diversity across leadership teams is a highly important issue that until recently has not been valued in many schools.

 

Two years ago, I connected with six secondary school leaders via social media. They were all women and were equally exasperated by the lack of females in school leadership roles. 

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2016-11-15T00:00:00

In the run-up to Anti-Bullying Week, new data shows that at least 11,300[1] <#_ftn1>  school leaders across the country have received negative or offensive comments on social media against themselves, their school or their staff.

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