Education

More than a quarter of Brits left school without any career advice

More than a quarter of Brits left school without any careers advice

More than a quarter of British students left secondary school without any careers advice, a recent study reports. 

The YouGov survey of more than 2,000 adults, which was commissioned by Oxford Open Learning Trust, and career change advice tool The Profession Picker, looked into the advice Brits received at school and how they felt about choosing their future career.

According to the results, only three out of 10 adults knew the career they wanted pursue after leaving secondary school and more than one in 10 (12%) felt that they chose their career pathway too young. 

The study also shows that just under a quarter (24%) of workers currently in a career say that this is what they thought they would end up doing when they left secondary school. 

The Effects of Digital Media Consumption on Education

The Effects of Digital Media Consumption on Education

According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, 92% of teens report using the internet on a daily basis, with 24% claiming to be online “almost constantly.” The prevalence of digital media consumption among young people can have a significant impact on their education and study habits.

 

In another Pew study, while nearly three-quarters of high school teachers admit that digital research tools can have a positive impact on student performance, 87% also say that digital tech has resulted in a generation of teenagers who are far more easily distracted than teens of the past.

 

Thousands of school pupils benefit from multi-million building project

Thousands of school pupils benefit from multi-million building project

A multi-million pound building project has been completed that will give more than 8,000 school pupils across Hertfordshire, Luton and Reading access to top-quality education facilities. 

The £135m project was undertaken by developer and investor Kajima, and partner Interserve Investments, and saw the completion of seven state-of-the-art schools, comprising Kings Langley School, Bishop's Hatfield Girls' School, Goffs School in Cheshunt, Longdean School in Hemel Hempstead, Reading Girls' School, Stopsley High School in Luton, and Westfield Academy in Watford. 

The rebuild was part of the government's £4.4bn Priority School Building Programme, which is rebuilding or refurbishing those school buildings in the very worst condition across the country. 

New figures reveal shocking literacy trend

New figures reveal shocking literacy trend

New research has unveiled the shocking truth about literacy and young children. 

A study undertaken by Ebookadabra in partnership with Censuswide has shown that one in 20 British parents with children between the ages of three and seven have reported that their child has never read a picture book.

That's about 200,000 children who never been exposed to a picture book. 

The study looks at individual areas around the UK and has discovered that Britain's UNESCO City of Literature, Norwich, is a particular literacy black spot, in addition to Brighton. 

According to the results, the 10 worst places for literacy in young people are:

1)      Brighton (13%)

2)      Norwich (12.9%) (Britain’s UNESCO City of Literature)

New wave of free schools given the green light

The Department for Education has approved 131 new schools

Thousands of schools places will be created after plans for more than 100 new free schools are given the green light. 

Plans for 131 new schools have been approved by the Department for Education today, creating more than 69,000 school places up and down the country. 

The majority of these schools (111) will become free schools, which can be run by parents, community or faith groups. 

A large proportion of these schools will be based in the East (18) and South East of England (27), with the fewest in the North West (5) and the North East (2) of the country. 

Teacher shortage crisis is now "critical"

Teacher shortage crisis reaches "critical level"

A leading recruitment agency has warned that the teacher shortage crisis is "reaching a critical level".

Latest figures from UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) have revealed that acceptances to teacher training courses have plummeted by seven per cent this year. 

This year is the fifth consecutive year where government targets for teacher training have been missed, with only 26,000 people being accepted on to teacher training courses for 2016 and 2017. 

Government launches new company to create 500 more free schools

Government launches new company to carry out plans for more free schools

The government has got the ball rolling on its pledge to deliver a new cohort of free schools by launching a new public property company. 

This new company, LocatED, has been created to acquire land and buildings across the country to help the government with its plans to build 500 new free schools by 2020, and create 600,000 new school places by 2021. 

Campaigners reacted with anger when the plans were announced, saying the money being ploughed into this project would be better spent on existing schools that are facing cuts of £3bn in the next three years. 

New super-union celebrates "historic moment"

Teachers across the UK have a powerful new voice after two of the nation's largest unions joined forces to create one "super-union".

The new National Education Union will become the biggest union of teachers and education professionals in the whole of Europe, as well as the fourth largest trade union in the UK, with almost half a million members. 

This new super-union, which was announced today, comprises the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) and the National Union of Teachers, and will come into existence on 1 September 2017. 

Mary Bousted, general secretary of ATL, paid tribute to this "historic" moment and hopes the it will provide the sector with a much more powerful voice. 

Leading actress supports scheme to raise aspirations among UK school pupils

Julie Walters is support Future First's campaign to raise aspirations in state schools

A leading actress has backed a campaign to inspire young people to achieve more by building alumni networks in every state school in the UK. 

BAFTA award-winning actress Julie Walters is supporting a campaign by national education charity Future First to help raise aspirations among young people by building connections with former students. 

This week celebrates Back to School Week, an event that has seen schools across Birmingham welcome back former pupils to work closely with existing students.

New apprenticeship register announced to help young people "climb the ladder of opportunity"

Government announces new apprenticeship

Some of the nation's leading training providers have been highlighted in a new register published by the Department for Education and the Skills Funding Agency. 

This register was created to enable people to find out more about different apprenticeships schemes and ensure they are receiving training with a top-quality provider. 

It also means that the trainers who are providing the courses tailor teaching to the needs of the apprentices and the requirements of the business they work in. 

School governing bodies on the hunt for expert legal knowledge

SGOSS Governors for Schools recruiting for volunteers with legal expertise

A new study has revealed that one third of school governing bodies are on the look out for expert legal knowledge. 

The survey carried out by SGOSS Governors for Schools, a national charity that links up schools with skilled volunteers from professional sectors, found that one in three schools who register with the body are seeking a governors with legal skills.

SGOSS Governors for Schools appoints new chief executive

An educational charity has welcomed on board a new chief executive who is set to oversee a period of growth and development. 

Louise Cooper takes up the position of chief executive of SGOSS Governors for Schools, which supplies a free governor search and selection service for schools looking to recruit candidates with commercial experience to boost the skill sets of the existing Board of Governors. 

In her new role, Louise will be required to lead the business through its next stage of growth, and to more than double the number of placements it makes each year, expanding its footprint into cold spot areas and increasing the impact it makes on the education system. 

UK firms increasingly embrace apprenticeships as part of recruitment policy

As National Apprenticeship Week draws to a close, new figures have been released highlighting just how popular the scheme has become in recent years. 

New research from AAT (Association of Accounting Technicians) has found that almost half (48%) of UK businesses have taken on an apprentice in the last five years.

The study shows that apprenticeships can act as a catalyst for young people looking for a quick route into employment, and the majority of businesses believe apprenticeships are on the up. 

More than three quarters (77%) of British businesses think that young people will consider other routes into employment than university, including apprenticeships, over the next five years. 

Chancellor claims £320m fund will allow children of all backgrounds reach their full potential

The Spring Budget was delivered in the House of Commons today

Today’s Budget has come under attack as the Chancellor faces claims that a £320m fund for free schools would be better spent elsewhere. 

Philip Hammond delivered his first Spring Budget this afternoon which highlighted plans to put aside £320m to fund 110 new free schools, in addition to the 500 already pledged to be created by 2020. 

The government believes its White Paper will create a more level playing field and provide equal opportunities for children of all backgrounds.

Unions slam free schools plan as an "irresponsible use of public money" ahead of tomorrow's Budget

Tomorrow's Budget will confirm £320m of funding for free schools

Teaching unions have spoken out in frustration regarding plans to invest £320m in free schools, while existing schools are forced to save £3bn by 2020.

Chancellor Philip Hammond is set to announce the multi-million pound fund in tomorrow's Budget, which will be used to create up to 140 new free schools, including grammar schools.

These will be in addition to the 500 already pledged to come into fruition by 2020 and aim to give power back into the hands of parents and local communities. 

Mr Hammond said: "These announcements take the next steps in giving parents greater choice in finding a good school for their child, whatever their background.”