DBS checks are a key part of safe recruitment. It’s clear that teachers need a DBS check - but what about people in other roles?

 

Famous former pupils of Blackpool schools are to help transform current students’ opportunities and give them a better start in life by going back to the classroom. The initiative to build alumni networks in schools and a college in the town, run by the education charity Future First and funded by the Government’s Careers and Enterprise Company, has been backed by the actors Jodie Prenger and Craig Parkinson who both grew up and studied in the town.

As National Apprenticeship Week begins, QA Education works with teen magazine Future Mag to find out about the new degree apprenticeships and how you go about getting one...

Degree apprenticeships – what are they and how can you get one?

On paper they make perfect sense. Degree apprenticeships are just that – a university degree and apprenticeship rolled into one – most are level 6 (bachelor’s) with a few leading to 7 (master’s).

Degree apprenticeships offer students the chance to work, study and earn at the same time in subjects from biomedical engineering to digital marketing. QA Education worked with teen magazine Future Mag to find out about these new apprenticeships and how you go about getting one.

Degree apprenticeships are new, uptake is still low and employers and universities are wary of red tape involved. But the good news is numbers are rising, and there are 27 new schemes launching in September 2018, which should – if all goes to plan - create thousands of new opportunities.

BBC Radio 1 host Nick Grimshaw is joining his former state school in Oldham to help transform students’ opportunities through alumni networks.

The programme, run by the education charity Future First and funded by the Government’s Careers and Enterprise Company, has been backed by the TV and radio broadcaster Nick Grimshaw who went to Our Lady's RC High School in Royton, now known as Blessed John Henry Newman Catholic College.

The makers of Back In Time For School ask: have you ever wondered what school life was like in the old days – for real?

The hit series Back In Time For Tea is looking for teachers and students to take part in an exciting new BBC Two history series, Back In Time For School.

They are gathering together a class of modern-day teachers and teenagers to experience the school days of previous generations… from the Victorian era to the 1990s.

Creative pupils at a Tyneside school harnessed the power of green energy as part of a learning programme to ignite their interest in science and technology.
 
Year 4 and year 6 pupils at Rowlands Gill Primary School have been working with Gateshead College on various activities designed to raise awareness of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) related challenges. 
 

Secondary schools in the UK are successfully embedding whole school allergy management by using the School Allergy Action Group (SAAG) toolkit, which has been piloted in diverse secondary schools.  This free seven step programme involves senior management teams, school nurses, teachers, caterers, pupils, parents and governors in the development of a whole school allergy management policy and in the ongoing work needed to ensure that its implementation is effective and consistent.

Athletic Development Days are a fun way to measure pupil’s athletic abilities and introduce fun and engaging long term athletic development programmes (LTAD) to schools. 

As if this new partnership wasn't exciting enough, as a 20th anniversary year offer, any school who works with Playforce in 2018 will be able to access one of these days free of charge*. During the day GCP coaches will deliver a range of challenges and fun sessions to the whole school, measure performance and hold a briefing session with school staff. 

The sessions will enable schools to:

Most parents worry their children are harming their future job prospects by over-sharing online
 
Over half of parents fear their children are ruining their reputations and future career prospects through the content they’re posting online, according to new research.
 
A survey of 1,500 UK parents, conducted by AgeChecked, found that 58% are concerned their children may share content that would embarrass them in the future, such as when they apply for jobs.