Blog

Professor of Play: Formalizing the connection between learning and play

learning and play

Play provides children important motor, perceptual, social, and neutral benefits - often described as children’s “most important work”. Despite the important role of play in the learning process, schools are allocating less time for free and open play in favor of activities that ‘teach to the test’. This deprioritization of open play is a missed opportunity to prepare kids for academic success. Cambridge University’s newly-established Centre for Research on Play in Education, Development and Learning (PEDAL), marks an important milestone in educational research: one that formalizes play in educational research and policy.

 

Cova Security Gates wins Manufacturing Business of the Year 2017 and celebrates three decades of success

Cova Security Gates

Cova Security Gates, the leading manufacturer of quality perimeter security equipment, has been awarded Manufacturing Business of the Year 2017 at the prestigious Gatwick Diamond Business Awards. Being recognised for its continued innovation and commitment to customer service in this way comes at a significant time for Cova, with the company celebrating its 30th year in business.

 

Top training tools for school sporting needs

goals

Phoenix Sporting Goods (PSG) was born on the 5th May 2015, to create and distribute a range of strong, performance led brands to the grass roots, sports education and professional markets, throughout the UK and Europe. With inspirational leadership and world class customer service, PSG’s aim is to aid aspiring athletes and their coaches, from grass roots to sporting professionals, to achieve their goals, with products that will increase the accuracy of the athlete through repetition or via products that will enable the athlete to train through the winter months on their own or within a team environment.

 

Where’s the creativity in coding?

Craig teaching coding

For more than four decades, the subject of computing has only managed to inspire a small percentage of students. In September 2014, following the realisation that technology now plays a key role in everyday life at home, work and school, the national curriculum changed and required all schools to teach computing to children aged five to16. The intention was to teach children how to problem solve and empower them to become creators of technology, rather than consumers, in preparation for life beyond school.

 

Ten years on, BYOD helps the flipped classroom come of age

students learning

2017 marks the ten year anniversary of when the ideology behind the flipped classroom first took hold. Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams, two chemistry teachers in Colorado, wanted to spend more time with each student during class time, so began posting their lectures online to free up time face to face time for discussion. Since then the concept has become popular all over the world, and with the onset of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), adoption has skyrocketed.

BYOD in the classroom

Highgate Farm Caravan Park and Campsite is the perfect place for that summer getaway.

Highgate Farm Caravan Park

Summer is nearly here, and as we head into the final term of the school calendar, panicked parents up and down the country begin to wonder how they will fill the long summer break?

One caravan park and campsite might just have the perfect solution. 

Nestled deep into the lush Norfolk countryside, Highgate Farm Caravan Park and Campsite is the perfect place to go for a quiet, rural retreat. 

The park has been run by dream team Lesley and Mike Smith for the past 16 years, but the site itself boasts an incredible history spanning more than 300 years. 

Handwriting vs Typing – Why the Pen is Mightier than the Keyboard

Are the days of the old pen and paper numbered? Where once we wrote letters to communicate with people in far-reaching places, we now turn to emails or social media. Where before we would have scribed handwritten notes, we’re now far more likely to type notes into a smartphone or tablet. It’s not unreasonable to suggest that handwriting is becoming a lost art.

Barefoot Boost For Computing Science In Welsh Primary Schools

chill writing

Calls for Welsh primary schools to sign up to project aimed at inspiring next generation of digital entrepreneurs

A new national project to help boost the computing skills of Welsh primary school children has been launched today (Weds 5 Apr) by Cabinet Secretary for Education, Kirsty Williams.

The Barefoot Computing project in Wales aims to help primary school teachers get to grips with computing so that they can inspire and excite pupils aged from five about the world of IT.

The initiative is funded and led by BT, which has worked closely with the Welsh Government to ensure resources for the project in Wales are closely aligned to the Digital Competence Framework and are available bilingually via the Hwb digital learning platform.

Forest school outdoor learning

Forest school outdoor learning nature hut

The Hideout House Company have created a new range of outdoor classrooms and shelters to complement the forest school revolution

As the Forest Schools programme spreads to more and more UK schools and is becoming ever more popular within both rural and urban educational environments, the Hideout House Company is now offering a creative and comprehensive range of products which complement this theme. The principal theme or philosophy being to encourage and inspire individuals of any age range through an innovative and long term approach to outdoor learning in a woodland or outside environment.

UK students working with IceCube Neutrino Observatory to examine radiation in Antarctica

Students from Tapton School in Sheffield are now working with the University of Wisconsin and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica as part of the “IcePix” project, run by the Institute for Research in Schools (IRIS). Using real data, relayed back to the school from particle cameras, the students will be able to measure the presence of background radiation in the polar region, which will then be added to a dataset of readings from around the world (and beyond) for comparison studies. 

38 per cent of students ‘reaching their limit’ when it comes to exams

phone app

A recent survey of 15-17 year olds has revealed that 86 per cent of students feel some level of stress during revision season, with 36 per cent saying they’re reaching their limit or feel completely overwhelmed. 

Over 46 per cent of students also said they revise for five or more hours every week, yet one fifth of students said they don’t feel supported by their teachers. 

Learn to Code in 15 minutes?

child using code

The new computing curriculum requires schools to teach students how to code and understand a number of, to the layman, somewhat complex concepts.

 

But can you teach children to understand simple programming in 15 minutes? Here at FUZE we certainly know we can – and actually teach core coding skills in that short space of time. 

 

Coding has a number of very important fundamentals. An understanding of Loops, Variables and ‘If Then’ statements is required to code using any programming language. In fact, it’s safe to say this is applicable to all programming languages from Machine Code (the most advanced) to Scratch (one of the simplest).

 

5 Crucial Exam Revision tips

studying image

CEO Matthew Glotzbach of Quizlet, the world’s largest online learning platform, shares his top tips for exam revision:

• Spaced-out revision sessions

The way most of us do revision is actually pretty ineffective; all-nighters, re-reading notes, underlining. What is more effective is frequent self-quizzing, shorter spaced-out revision sessions, and presenting information to yourself in different ways throughout your study time. 

• Planning ahead

Regional schools commissioner to visit Oswestry at festival of education!

Ms Christine Quinn.

The Regional Schools Commissioner for the West Midlands, Christine Quinn, will be opening and speaking at The Marches Festival of Education on Thursday 29th June.

 

Before her appointment as Regional School Commissioner, she was the CEO and executive principle of the Ninestiles Academy Trust in Birmingham, where she had worked since 1991.

 

As part of her role, Ms Quinn is responsible for overseeing growth of academies across the region’s 16 local authorities and closely monitors their performance. Currently, there are over 700 academies in the West Midlands and Ms Quinn, advised by a board of headteachers of outstanding academies and experienced educational leaders, will shape the role and priorities of the growing number of academies.