News

Diversity Matters: Who is on your Senior Leadership Team?

Two thirds of the teaching profession are women and yet only one third reach a level of leadership. This is an incredible and tragic fact, isn’t it?!

 

For most, this might be surprising, yet in the 21st Century we have all continued to allow it to happen. Diversity across leadership teams is a highly important issue that until recently has not been valued in many schools.

 

Two years ago, I connected with six secondary school leaders via social media. They were all women and were equally exasperated by the lack of females in school leadership roles. 

 

Collaborating for innovation in edtech

Collaborating for innovation in edtech

The rise of the Multi Academy Trust offers new ways for suppliers and schools to work more closely together

The number of academies and multi academy trusts (MATs) increases on a monthly basis. At Bett Academies (16-18 March, NEC, Birmingham) the director of Assembly, a non-profit joint venture between Ark and NEON, will be talking to suppliers and MATs about the changing needs of these schools, and how collaboration will help the next wave of edtech to evolve.

 

Money for Grammar Schools is only part of the solution

Alan Fraser

I’m going to start with a confession. I went to a grammar school.

At the time it didn’t feel particularly controversial, indeed my father – who left school at fifteen with a certificate saying he could read and write, and who had never earned more than £60-a-week by the time he died in 1987 – was incredibly proud of my achievement.

But today mentioning that you went to one of the nation’s hated grammar schools seems tantamount to admitting to a criminal record. Rather than being the passport to a better career that we were promised, I’m half expecting ‘grammar school attendance’ to start showing up on my annual DBS check and being used as a justification for excluding me from sensitive roles.

Chancellor claims £320m fund will allow children of all backgrounds reach their full potential

The Spring Budget was delivered in the House of Commons today

Today’s Budget has come under attack as the Chancellor faces claims that a £320m fund for free schools would be better spent elsewhere. 

Philip Hammond delivered his first Spring Budget this afternoon which highlighted plans to put aside £320m to fund 110 new free schools, in addition to the 500 already pledged to be created by 2020. 

The government believes its White Paper will create a more level playing field and provide equal opportunities for children of all backgrounds.

Protecting children from online dangers

Stella James

Recently, there has been an increasingly alarming number of reports in the media about children being targeted and groomed online. Pretty much everything our children do now is connected with being online; young people do not differentiate between online and offline life, it is simply ‘their life’. Therefore, we need to educate younger generations toensure they’re able to navigate the internet safely, says Stella James, founder of Gooseberry Planet. 

Kids to go bananas over their lunchbox

Freddy Fyffes, the cartoon character

24,000 primary schools across the UK are being invited to ask their pupils: ‘How does a banana get to your lunchbox?’

The question forms part of an educational campaign run by the charity Seafarers UK in partnership with Fyffes. It will encourage children to think about the maritime world and how 95% of UK imports come by sea, including their favourite fruit, with the UK eating more than five billion bananas every year.

Freddy Fyffes, the cartoon character, stars in a free fun activity sheet aimed at five to sevenyear olds, for use in the classroom or at home. Freddy travels from a banana farm, across the sea, to Fyffes’ ripening and distribution centres, then on to greengrocers and supermarket shelves.

Institute for Research in Schools’ “remarkable” first year

• The Institute for Research in Schools was launched in March 2016 and is now celebrating its first year

• It currently works with over 300 schools in the UK and internationally to facilitate student-led research projects and empower teachers in STEM

• IRIS has launched over 10 projects this year, including TimPix, a project run in association with the UK Space Agency that was recently promoted by NASA to schools in the US

 

School Letting Solutions wins 100th partnership to help schools increase income

School Letting Solutions

One of the fastest growing sport and leisure companies in the country has secured its 100th partnership in a bid to generate extra income for schools.

School Lettings Solutions, which matches schools seeking additional income with clubs looking for quality facilities, continues its nationwide expansion by partnering with Parkside Community College in Cambridge. 

Entrepreneurs Paul Andrews and Scott Warrington founded School Letting Solutions in 2011 and now employ over 400 staff.

School Letting Solutions works in partnership with schools across the country to improve access to high quality facilities for over 5,000 sports clubs, performing arts groups and community organisations. 

North East college invited to join national skills policy debate

education select committee visit to gateshead college

A North East college has been chosen as a key destination for a fact-finding mission that could shape future policy on post-16 education in Britain.   

Education Select Committee MPs met with Gateshead College staff and representatives from the North East Local Enterprise Partnership, CBI, North East England Chamber of Commerce and local businesses to learn about the skills challenges facing the region and how they fit into the government’s modern industrial strategy.

Launched in January by Prime Minister Theresa May, the strategy includes plans for a radical overhaul of technical education to address its historical undervaluation in the UK and provide a credible alternative to the academic route for young people who choose not to go to university.

Unions slam free schools plan as an "irresponsible use of public money" ahead of tomorrow's Budget

Tomorrow's Budget will confirm £320m of funding for free schools

Teaching unions have spoken out in frustration regarding plans to invest £320m in free schools, while existing schools are forced to save £3bn by 2020.

Chancellor Philip Hammond is set to announce the multi-million pound fund in tomorrow's Budget, which will be used to create up to 140 new free schools, including grammar schools.

These will be in addition to the 500 already pledged to come into fruition by 2020 and aim to give power back into the hands of parents and local communities. 

Mr Hammond said: "These announcements take the next steps in giving parents greater choice in finding a good school for their child, whatever their background.”

Celebrated author announced as judge for top writing competition

Author Steve Backshall is this year's judge

Budding, young writers across the nation are being called to put their talent to the test and battle it out to be crowned champion of a prestigious literary competition. 

The National Young Writers' Awards are back and on the lookout for a wonderful wordsmith to take up this year's highly-contested title. 

Over the past nine years, the awards have seen hundreds of thousands of schoolchildren put to pen to paper and try their hand at storytelling, and this year, competition bosses are hoping to inspire even more young people to give writing a go. 

This year's theme is "The Future", and children will have to write a 500-word story set in 3017. Stories could see families living in space, robots ruling the world or even a new species of animal roaming the wild. 

Students urged to take part in National Apprenticeship Week events

SFA apprentices supporting #NAW2017

Today marks the start of the 10th annual National Apprenticeship Week. 

Schools, colleges and businesses across the nation are joining forces this week to celebrate the wealth of opportunities facing young people leaving school. 

The week got off to a roaring start with a special event held at Barclays Bank on Canary Wharf, where education secretary Justine Greening addressed an audience of 100 employers and apprentices. 

In her speech, Ms Greening praised the lifelong benefits of apprenticeships, calling them a "gold-standard route into a great career".

Shabby Schools Are Failing Students & Teachers According To Education Sector Boss

Gerard Toplass, chief executive officer of British Thornton

New Research Reveals Major Decline in Spend on Learning Environments

The head of one of the UK’s leading education sector suppliers has said that a growing number of ‘shabby schools’ across the UK are not only failing pupils but are contributing to the lack of new entrants to the teaching profession, when linked to new schools spending data revealed by the company. 

New research by British Thornton, the UK’s largest educational furniture manufacturer, has shown that cuts to funding in the sector have led to significant reductions in investment in learning environments, to the detriment of both students and teachers alike. 

Half of school-leavers are considering taking on an apprenticeship after school

Most employers hire someone with the right attitude and relevant work experience

Half of school students aged between 16 and 18 say they will consider an apprenticeship after leaving school, a new report claims. 

The study was commissioned by AAT (Association of Accounting Technicians) ahead of National Apprenticeship Week next week to find out more about what it is young people are after. 

Results from the study showed that 37% of young people wanted to start earning money straight away, while 35% wanted to get valuable work experience, and 30% wanted to learn valuable work skills as soon as possible. 

The study also revealed that two thirds of 16-30 year olds (that's eight million young Britons) think an apprenticeship could fast track their careers over going to university. 

Sex education to be made compulsory in all English schools

Sex education to be made compulsory in all English secondary schools

A new government announcement has outlined that all English secondary schools will have to teach sex and relationships education. 

Education secretary Justine Greening made the announcement yesterday to make amendments to the Children and Social Work Bill to make lessons compulsory in all English secondary schools. 

The amendments also enable the government to make regulations requiring PSHE (personal, social, health and economic education) to be taught in all primary, secondary, maintained and academy schools in England. 

PSHE and relationships education aim to equip students with valuable knowledge and life schools to stay safe and develop healthy and supportive relationships, especially as they grow up in a new digital age.